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Repotting   [ Horticulture]
To re-pot

Dictionary of botanic terminology - index of names

     
  The practice of taking a pot-grown plant out of its pot at regular intervals and replanting to refresh the substatum and encourage renewed root growth.  
     
Transferring a plant from one pot to another, normally, this means potting up, but it can also mean potting down. Primary purpose of repotting is to provide fresh media, not necessarily a larger pot, but pot size should be selected according to the size of the root mass. Plants generally like to be a little tight in their pots. Plants transferred to overly large pots tend to concentrate their energy on root growth and may not show good growth of foliage or stems.

Plants may be potted in plastic, clay or decorator pots, and the type of pot selected may influence watering frequency; plants in clay pots will need more frequent watering, as they will dry out a little faster. Always select pots with drainage holes; plant roots in contact with stagnant water will rot and die, killing the plant. Media in the centre of larger pots may remain wet for long periods and become an unhealthy environment for roots. This can be avoided by placing pieces of broken terra cotta in the bottom of the pot. A smaller pot inverted into a larger one can also help with drainage and aeration, with the roots of the plant draped over and around the smaller pot.
Plants grown in the ground can have root systems that extend beyond the shadow of their own foliage canopy in a search for water and nutrients. But containerised plants are limited by the size of their pot as to how far they can extend. They need to be constantly supplied with food and water on which to survive. Their root systems however, continue to grow in tandem with their leaves and branches above the surface of the soil.
After a period of time that varies between different plants and plant species, the root systems of all pot-grown plants fill their containers, and become 'pot-bound'. Under these conditions, new fine feeder roots that are so essential to the uptake of water and nutrients in a plant have little room to grow, the soil structure deteriorates and the plant starts to suffer.
Primary purpose of repotting is to provide fresh media, not necessarily a larger pot, but pot size should be selected according to the size of the root mass. Plants generally like to be a little tight in their pots. Plants transferred to overly large pots tend to concentrate their energy on root growth and may not show good growth or foliage or stems.

Many plants during repotting  are root-pruned.
 
     

 

 

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