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  Alöe aculeata CACTUSPEDIA       

 


Aloe aculeata is easily identified from other similiar species with conspicuous sharp spines on the leaves in that it is the only known aloe whose spines spring from tuberculate white base bumps.
It is perhaps one of the most well known Aloes to South Africans
as it was depicted on the old nickle 10 cent piece.
 

Cultivation: This plant grows well in light shade to full sun (Leaves given ideal light, it turns a lovely red and oranges, they tend also to turn red in low water and cold situations). This species requires regular water in summer,  but is dormant and needs very little water in winter, keep it totally dry at or around 4°C. It is easily rooted in potting soil with warmth. Needs good drainage. It grows much better outdoors in spring and summer, it is also perfect for the bright windowsill.  Avoid any frost.

Propagation: Exclusively by seeds
 

Family: Asphodelaceae

Scientific name:  Aloe aculeata Pole-Evans

Origin:  Aloe aculeata can be found in several areas in south Africa (Northern Province, Mpumalanga) and it extends into Zimbabwe.

Habitat:  It is found in rocky areas in grassland and openbushveld.

Common Names include: Red hot poker aloe

Etymology: The species name "aculeata" comes from the Latine for "prickly" refers to the leaf surface that is covered in uberculate spines.

Description: Aloe aculeata is a (usually) solitary stemless rosette which grows up to approximately 60(-100) cm high, 30(-100) in diameter if not contained by pot.
Rosette: Each rosette is composed by flattish fat leaves that arch upward like a bowl, though as plants age, plants tend to fall over a bit and lose this semicircular sillohuette.
Leaves: Long and quite broad at the base , 120mm wide, from dull green to turquoise with reddish-brown triangular teeth (or thorns) on the margins and undersides. These warty spines have a different white base colour which give the plant a mottled appearance. The spines is variable, and many older plant populations have no more spines.
Flowers: Some specimens are uniform in colour while others bicoloured, Colors are variable from red to orange to red and yellow, all the way to greenish yellow. Flowers are tubular in shape, 40mm in length, and flattened downward helping distinguish this aloes from most other non-suckering, stemless South African Aloes.
In young plants the infloresence is single up 1 m tall, as the plant matures the inflorescence may split into three or four branches. Each raceme is long and narrow and gradually tapers to the tip.
Blooming season: Mid winter (in northern hemisphere) .
Remarks:
Aloe peglerae can be mistaken for Aloe aculeata when not in flower, but the presence of thorns on both leaf surface is a characteristic unique to Aloe peglerae.
 

 


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This old page has been moved! Click the link next on the right to enter the new Enciclopedia of Succulents. We hope you find this new site informative and useful.

Encyclopedia of Succulents