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  Braunsia apiculata CACTUSPEDIA       

 


Braunsia apiculata
A
drought tolerant mini bush with tufted leaves.
 

Description: Braunsia apiculata is a dwarf mat-forming perennial succulent which has short woody erect or prostrate stems. The whole plant is velvety and can grow up to 200 mm tall.
Leaves: Silvery green, keel shaped, paired, opposite, stacking one pair on top of the other. They are joined for a quarter to half of their length, with pale cartilaginous or translucent margins and ending in a sharp, dry point
Flowers: Pretty pink or magenta.
Blooming season: Early spring.
Family: Mesebrianthemaceae (Aizoaceae)
 

Scientific name:  Braunsia apiculata (Kensit) L.Bolus

Origin:  Originally native from Western Cape (South Africa) it has been introduced elsewhere.

Habitat: Grows on rocky outcrops and on quartz pebble patches.

Etymology: The species "apiculata" is so named because its leaves with a short broad point (apiculate leaves).

 

 



Cultivation: Braunsia is a moderately slow growing pot subject. This species is easy to grow and clumps forming a beautiful succulent mat. Needs moderate water when growing in late fall and early spring. Keep somewhat dry the rest of the time. Like all living rocks, they thrive in porous soils with excellent drainage. It can tolerates high heat and some frost (hardy to -5 C or less if very dry). It is a very rewarding succulent and can be cultivated in desert garden in warm climates or in greenhouses or windowsills in the home where too hardy. Enjoy bright shade in summer and full sun on the other seasons.

Propagation: They grow quickly from seed or by division of larger clumps.

 

Photo gallery: Alphabetical listing of Cactus and Succulent pictures published in this site.

Photo gallery BRAUNSIA



 

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This old page has been moved! Click the link next on the right to enter the new Enciclopedia of Succulents. We hope you find this new site informative and useful.

Encyclopedia of Succulents