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  Clivia miniata "Chinese Five Colours Orchid" CACTUSPEDIA       

 


It has broad shiny leaves striped with various colours of white, cream, and several shades of yellow and green. It is extremely decorative even when it is not flowering.

 

Description: The standard Clivia miniata is a very popular plant  commonly known as the bush lily or fire lily and has orange flowers with yellow throats and wide large dark green leaves. The variegated Clivias are very desirable plant but still rare.
The cv  'Chinese Five Color Orchid' is one of the best new introduction, it is similar to the usual, large flowered, orange clivia except that it it has broad shiny leaves striped with various colours of white, cream, and several shades of yellow and green. It is extremely decorative even when it is not flowering. Some plants have many fine stripes while others have wide bands of cream or yellowish-white colour. The amount of variegation usually improves with age.
Clivia is related to the common Amaryllis. However, unlike Amaryllis, Clivia retains its foliage year round and is thus a valuable and decorative houseplan
Stem: The stem of the clivia miniata is a compact rhizome which only rarely becomes aerial when plants are very old. It sucker freely and can form large clumps if left undisturbed.
Roots: Swollen, succulent.
Leaves:  50 mm to 90 mm wide. Up to about 1 metre in length (or more)
Flowers: Small to large and trumpet-shaped with broad overlapping tepals. The inner tepals are usually broader than the outer tepals. The normal colour of the flowers is orange with a yellowish-white throat, although a colour range from whitish yellow through pale oranges, dark orange and approaching red is known. The very light and very dark colours are, however, rare. The flowers are borne in an umbel supported by a peduncle which clears the leaves, and the umbels can have in excess of 40 flowers, although 20 is more usual.
Blooming season: Spring to summer, once the flowers are mature which will be in approx 3 years.
Fruits: The seeds are carried in berries which can have from 1 to more than 20 seeds in a berry, although less than 10 is the norm.
 

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Some plants have many fine stripes while others have wide bands of cream or yellowish-white colour.
The amount of variegation usually improves with age. It catches the eye of everyone that sees it.

Family: Amaryllidaceae

Scientific name:  Clivia miniata (Lindley) Regel
Gartenflora 14: 131, t.434.1828
cv.  'Chinese Five Color Orchid'

Origin Garden origin (Nursery produced cultivar)

Common English Names include: Variegated bush lily or Variegated fire lily

Etymology: The genus  Clivia gained in honour of Lady Charlotte Florentina Clive, Duchess of Northumberland.

Synonyms:

  • Vallota Miniata Regel
    The Gardener's Chronicle 8: 119.
  • Imanthophyllum miniatum Hooker
  • Himantophyllum miniatum Kook
  • Clivia citrina
  • Clivia kewensis
 



These very showy and delightfully colorful plants brighten a clivia collection by contrasting their highly variegated foliage with that of the deep green types.

Cultivation: Clivias are outstanding houseplant; easy to grow, need little care and flower late winter.
Be aware that full sun will burn the leaves. They need some shade and require far less sun than most flowering plants. Clivias should be potted in a rich, but well well-drained soil (for example: peat, fine pine bark mulch and lava great ) a pH 5.5-6.5 best suits them. The soil should never become soggy or water sodden, but should drain well even when watered often. Placing one or more small, empty pots upside down on the bottom of the container will enhance drainage. Do not plant them too deep! The roots should be covered with only a 0,5 cm of soil. Regular fertilization and regular irrigation are beneficial. Use balanced slow release fertilizer, every three months, but any complete fertilizer will do. If they are kept at room temperature and watered year round they will grow into lovely plants, but they will not flower. Inducing them to flower is easy. In the Fall and Winter keep them cool 10į C. Keep them dry to interrupt the growth cycle and initiate bud formation. I do this from November until January giving water about once a month. Then water less sparingly until flower buds appear after which they can be displayed anywhere. They are a very welcome sight in late Winter. Clivias bloom and perform best when allowed to become rootbound, so donít overpot them in a pot that is too large, they rally love being crowded in a pot, so leave them undisturbed for many years. Once your plant blooms the first time, it will usually bloom about the same time each year. They will grow well under trees, on the north side of your house, in a shaded area in the greenhouse or in rooms of your house that receives indirect light or curtain filtered light. Pruning: Remove old leaves and stems.
 

 

Photo gallery: Alphabetical listing of Cactus and Succulent pictures published in this site.

Photo gallery Clivia



 

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This old page has been moved! Click the link next on the right to enter the new Enciclopedia of Bulbs. We hope you find this new site informative and useful.