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  Echinocereus rigidissimus CACTUSPEDIA       

 


Echinocereus rigidissimus GL501 Peloncillo Mts., NM..
A jewel of the Sonoran Desert, this species has a tight lattice of tiny spines that hide the body of the plant.
 

Description: Solitary (very rarely few branched)
Stem: erect, short cylindric 6 to 20 (-30) cm tall, 4-11 cm wide
Ribs: 2 18-23(-26), slightly undulate
Spinea: No central spines; 16 to 22 stiff pectinate radials, appressed, straight or slightly curved toward stem, grey, reddish brown, bright pink or pink-and-white in alternating bands of colour around stem, 5- 10 mm long. Mature plants with a good light will generally have red to deep pink spines that band the stems. Each year’s growth is differentiated by differently coloured band of spines, hence the common name Arizona Rainbow.
Flowers: Bright pink with much lighter throat, 6-7 cm long, up to 10 cm in diameter. It blooms in late spring summer (May-July).
Fruits: Globose, greenish or dark purplish brownish very spiny, 3 cm in diameter, pulp white. Fruiting 3 months after flowering
 

The flowers on both are bright pinkish-red or magenta or red with white throats.
 

Echinocereus rigidsisssimis spine detail - ID: 4466374 © Irwin  Lightstone
Photo & © copyright by Irwin Lightstone Images may not be copied, downloaded, or used in any way without the expressed, written permission of the photographer.
 


 


Photo and © copyright by Andrea Italy



Photo and © copyright by Andrea Italy

Family: Cactaceae (Cactus Family)

Scientific name:  Echinocereus rigidissimus (Engelmann) F. Haage
Published in: Special Preisverz. 13. 1897.

Common Name:

  • Arizona Rainbow

  • Hedgehog Cactus

  • Cabeza de Viejo

Origin:   USA (south-eastern Arizona, south-western New Mexico), Mexico (northern Sonora, north-western Chihuahua)

Habitat: Grows on gravely hills, steep canyon sides, semidesert grasslands, oak woodlands, interior chaparral, igneous substrates; 1200-1600 m. The reported habitat preference for limestone is erroneous; this species is a calcifuge, preferring soils poor in lime and usually acid.

Conservation status: Listed in CITES appendix 2.

Synonyms:

  • Cereus pectinatus Engelmann var. rigidissimus Engelmann
     Published in:Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts 3: 279. 1856;
  • Echinocereus pectinatus var. rigidissimus (Engelmann) Rümpler

Notes: Echinocereus rigidissimus, lacking central spines, belongs to the E. reichenbachii group, unrelated to the superficially similar E. pectinatus group, which has at least microscopically visible stubs of central spines. It sometimes occurs with E. pseudopectinatus but without evidence of hybridization.
 

 



Photo and © copyright by Andrea Italy
Echinocereus rigidissimus v. rubispinus
 (L088 Sierra Oscura, W. Chihuahua, MX) 
Huge 7 to 10 cm wide, shocking pink  with white-eyed flowers.



Cultivation:
The E. rigidissimus is not the easiest cactus to grow, but when grown well it’s very attractive. Rot easily it is sensitive to overwatering (rot prone), so perfect soil drainage is a must. It prefer a neutral to slightly acidic compost with plenty of extra grit.  Best if watered with rain water and given an occasional tonic of sequestrated iron. In the summer they need an airy location in bright sun; well watered when it's hot. To achieve the best spine colors give these plants lots of sun. In the winter light, cool, and absolutely dry conditions. Very cold resistant  above approx -12C or less for short periods of time. In mild climate they grow well when planted freely outside in well-drained soil.
Propagation:
Seeds.

Photo of conspecific taxa, varieties, forms and cultivars of Echinocereus rigidissimus:

Photo gallery: Alphabetical listing of Cactus and Succulent pictures published in this site.

Photo gallery Echinocereus



 

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This old page has been moved! Click the link next on the right to enter the new Enciclopedia of Cacti. We hope you find this new site informative and useful.

The Encyclopedia of Cacti