Cactuspedia home | E-mail | Photo gallery | Dictionary | Search 

This old page has been moved! Click the link next on the right to enter the new Enciclopedia of Cacti. We hope you find this new site informative and useful.

The Encyclopedia of Cacti

 

Echinocereus roemeri
(syn: Echinocereus coccineus ssp. coccineus)
CACTUSPEDIA       

 


E. coccineus var. roemeri DJF1306 Llano Co. TX USA (MG 191,29)
Some are difficult to see until the bright orange-red blooms in Spring make them impossible to miss!
 

Description: Usually densely caespitose, often in large colonies up to 1 m in diameter, containing sometimes 200 or more simple stems.
Stems: Dark green,  ovoid to cylindrical, 20-40 cm tall, 3 to 5 in diameter .
Ribs: 8 to 11 somewhat tuberculed.
Spines: ± Acicular,  mostly undifferentiated between radials and centrals;
Radial spines:  (5-)8-12(-20) round in cross-section,  1-2 cm long
, usually whitish.
Central spines: 0 to 4
, longer and stouter somewhat angular in cross-section, the main one often flattened,  up to 7.5 cm long; usually yellowish or whitish, but sometimes reddish or blackish.
Flowers:
Borne below the stems apex, oftem unisexual (plants dioecious) broad Infundibuliform, orange-red, crimson or (rarely) pinkish, 3-10 cm long, up to 8 cm in diameter, perianth-segment obtuse or retuse, stigma with 7 or 8 lobes, usually greenish, areoles on flower, and ovary felted, bearing short white bristly spines.
Blooming season: Spring. The bloom
ing period of large plants can extend over a period of weeks, with each bloom remaining open for several days and nights.
Fruits: Globose, becoming red, with spines falling away.
Remarks: Female and male flowers. Echinocereus coccineus is a cactus with both hermaphroditic (bisexual) and dioecious (male and female) forms of flowers on different plants. Male flower shows pollen-filled anthers surrounding the base of the stigma lobes.ì, while functional female flowers from different plants show reduced filaments and empty anther sacs held below the stigma lobes.
The flowers appear specialized for hummingbirds, but are also pollinated by bees.  They are huge and highly rewarding, and daily nectar production averaged 30 mg sugar/flower.  This set of traits represents a syndrome rare among hummingbird flowers, in which the flower fits the head rather than just the bill, and birds are well rewarded for a risky or inconvenient visit.

Uses: This species is used medicinally as a heart stimulant.
 


An hermaphroditic flower


A female flower  with reduced filaments and empty anther sacs held below the stigma lobes.

Family: Cactaceae (Cactus Family)

Conservation status: Listed in CITES Appendix II

Scientific name:  Echinocereus roemeri (Engelmann) Engelmann ex Haage 1859 

Taxonomy: Basionym : Cereus roemeri Engelmann 1849:50.
[not Mühlenpfordt]. TL: Texas, granitic region of the Llano. Lindheimer, 1847 (MO).

OriginSouthwestern USA (New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, west Texas and Colorado), Mexico (Sonora, Coahuila, Chihuahua)

Conservation status: Listed in CITES appendix 2.

Common Names include:  'Golden Rainbow Hedgehog' & 'White-spined Claret-cup Cactus'.

Synonyms:  

  • Echinocereus coccineus fa. roemeri Parker 1996:4 nom. nud.
  • Echinocereus coccineus ssp. roemeri Blum, Lange & Rutow in Blum et al.1998
    Note: Usually listed as Echinocereus roemeri Engelmann ex Rümpler 1885
  • Echinocereus roemeri (Mühlenpfordt) Rydberg 1906: nom. illeg.    (later homonym).
  • Echinocereus roemeri Lemaire 1868:56 nom. nud.
  • Cereus roemeri Mühlenpfordt 1848
    (syn of E. robustus (Peebles) Peebles 1940 (?)
    TL: Northern Texas, Roemer (?).

Notes: Nowadays E. roemeri is regarded by botanists as E.coccineus ssp. coccineus.  This taxon is closely related to and easily confused  with E. triglochidiatus, and there are many cases of hybridization between the species.

 

 

 


 

Photo of conspecific taxa, varieties, forms and cultivars of Echinocereus coccineus.


Photo gallery: Alphabetical listing of Cactus and Succulent pictures published in this site.

Photo gallery Echinocereus



 

Cactuspedia home | E-mail | Photo gallery | Dictionary | Search 

This old page has been moved! Click the link next on the right to enter the new Enciclopedia of Cacti. We hope you find this new site informative and useful.

The Encyclopedia of Cacti