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Epithelantha micromeris ssp. unguispina CACTUSPEDIA       

 


The plant above is a 25 year-old specimen (Ex Prof. Lodi collection)
 

Description: E. micromeris ssp. unguispina is a little larger than the standard form.  The stem is globular, up to 6 cm, often clumping over time.  It also differs in that it generally has a small projecting black-tipped central spine, 4-5mm long, while the 18-24 radials are white and flattened, 2mm long.
 

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Epithelantha micromeris unguispina - ID: 3510191  Irwin  Lightstone
Photo &
copyright by Irwin Lightstone Images may not be copied, downloaded, or used in any way without the expressed, written permission of the photographer.


Photo of conspecific taxa, varieties, forms an cultivars of Epithelantha micromeris:

Family: Cactaceae (Cactus Family) 

Scientific name:  Epithelantha micromeris ssp.unguispina

Conservation status: Listed in CITES appendix 2.

Synonyms:

  • Epithelantha spinosior
 



The flowers are pink and larger than those of the other Epithelanthas.

Cultivation: Although regarded as a choice and difficult plant, in cultivation it is relatively easy, but very slow growing. These plants need very coarse potting soil that drains well (rot prone). Waterings should be rather infrequent, to keep the plant compact and not become excessively elongated or unnatural in appearance.
Frost Tolerance: Depending on the variety, it will take
-5 C (or less) (Temperature Zone: USDA
8-11)
Sun Exposure: It requires strong sun to part sun to develop good spinal growth,
but some summer shade in the hottest hours of the day is beneficial. Assure a good ventilation.
Propagation:
It can be reproduced both by seeds and cuttings, but it is often grafted because difficult and slow to grow on its own roots. Older specimens shoot tillers from under tubercles, so they can be grafted, which is a much easier way of propagation than sowing. Young seedlings are tiny and they need several years to reach adult size, and require careful watering.



 

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