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  Glottiphyllum suave CACTUSPEDIA       

 


Glottiphytllum aff. flavum SL84-357 16 k sw Laingsburg
The flowers are a very cheerful yellow daisy flower, and  the following seed pods are really cool.
 

Description: Small, compact, very succulent, prostrate, clump-forming plant that forms whorls of waxy green leaves up to 10 cm in diameter (but often more in cultivation). There are indeed marked differences in sizes of leaf and flowers in plants from different population and also the growing condition (especially sun exposure) determine differences in habit of cultivate specimens.
Stem: Almost stem less.
Leaves: In 2 to 4 ranks, equal or moderately unequally tongue-shaped, tapered to to a sharp point, soft, glossy, light absorbing, and dark-green to waxy grey
. They are succulent and very juicy in texture, reminiscent of gummy bears, in full sun they assume a purplish colouring
Flowers: Bright yellow, large (4-8 cm in diameter), daisy-like, scented and very showy. They are clustered near the centre of the rosette. They are self-sterile, which means that you need different plants from the same location to obtain seeds.
Blooming season: The conspicuous flowers
come mostly in lat Autumn through to late in winter.

Notes: The 50 or so species of this South African genus of succulents are so similar that many may be hybrids.
 


The flowers of this species are scented.

 


Buds are
are clustered near the centre of the rosette.

 

 

Photo gallery: Alphabetical listing of Cactus and Succulent pictures published in this site.

Photo gallery GLOTTIPHYLLUM

Family: Mesebrianthemaceae (Aizoaceae)

Scientific name:  Glottiphyllum suave N.E.Brown 1928
 
Origin
:  Native of the drier areas of the Cape (South africa)

Habitat: Grows in a region that consists of flat plains or gently rolling hills - that seem to just go on for miles in every direction - completely covered with small sandstone fragments of quartz atop rocky soil.  Some plant in habitat have scars or burst in their skins, just like they do at home.

Conservation status: Listed in CITES appendix 2.

Common Names include: Tounge-Leaf

Etymology: The name is from the ancient Greek "γλωττίς" (glottis) , Tongue, and "φύλλον" (Phyllon), leaf, The name implies "shaped as a tongue"
 


 

 

 


They are often grown because of their irresistibility to be touched. People cannot walk past them without giving the leaves a gentle squeeze.

Cultivation: The plants in this genus represent some of the more easily cultivated succulent species ; These plants grow on winter rain and were heading for spring-summer dormancy. Requires little water otherwise their epidermis breaks (resulting in unsightly scars). Water moderately from the middle of summer to the end of winter, and keep the compost almost dry when the plants are dormant. Water minimally in spring and summer, only when the plant starts shrivelling (, but they will generally grow even in summer if given water) In areas prone to frost, grow in an intermediate greenhouse or conservatory, in pots of cactus compost, obtainable from good garden centres. Keep cool and shaded in summer, but provide maximum light the rest of the year.
Propagation:
Seeds or cuttings. Seeds can be sown in early to mid-spring and germinated in heated humid environment. Alternatively, use stem cuttings taken towards the end of summer in an heated propagating case (15-21C)



 

Cactuspedia home | E-mail | Photo gallery | Dictionary | Search 

This old page has been moved! Click the link next on the right to enter the new Enciclopedia of Succulents. We hope you find this new site informative and useful.

Encyclopedia of Succulents