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  Lithops lesliei C36B ( cv. Storms albinigold)
(TL) near Warrenton Northern Cape SA
CACTUSPEDIA       

 


Nice yellowish green body and top with fine intricate green pattern. Flowers are yellow.

 

Description: It is among the easiest species to grow and is available in several distinct subspecies, variety and cultivated forms. It looks like a flowering brain, with a big, umbrella-shaped daisy flower taking its nourishment from the frontal lobes. It grows solitary or in small clumps of 1 to 10 paired leaves (mostly 2 to 5) up to 5 cm wide (often more in cultivation)
Stem: Almost stemless.
Roots: It has soft rootstocks.
Bodies (paired leaves):  quite large 2-4 cm wide. Each plant consists of a pair of extremely thick and equally or slightly unequally sized leaves fused together and separated by a shallow fissure (2-5 mm) with conjuncted lobes. The bodies are shaped like a truncate inverse, gray-green to buff, cone, flattened to slightly convex in its upper portion. The top of the leaves is elliptic to slightly reniform and varies considerably in colour depending on the substrate of origin; the colours comprises Yellow/brown, greyish/yellow, orange, rust, grey, grey/white, dark coffee, with a fine lacework of greenish-brown spots, tracing and furrows. Despite the variability in colour, the shape of this species is relatively uniform and generally recognizable by its mainly green windows or channels, and very irregular rust-brown islands with numerous mini-windows and fairly narrow, distinct and irregular margins
Flowers: A single medium to very large yellow (or rarely white) daisy-like flower emerges from the fissure and is as large as the pair of fleshy leaves below. About 3-5 cm wide, diurnal.

Blooming season:
From mid-summer through fall.
Seeds: light to dark brown, very fine.

Recognized subspecies, varieties and forms:

  • L. lesliei v. lesliei: Cole number(s): C014, C020, C028, C036, C026, C151, C344, C352. Deep rusty brown with brown windows; flowers golden yellow.

  • L. lesliei v. mariae: Cole number(s):C141, C152. Gold specled with clear, orangish body with many very fine, pinspots darker dots. Yellow flowers. Distribution: RSA: OFS, in a small area within the range of var. lesliei, to the W of Boshoff and N and NE of Kimberley.

  • L. lesliei v. venteri: Cole number(s):C001, C047, C153. Grey body with grey black denticulate windows, like small worms. Yellow flowers. Distribution: RSA: CP, in a fairly narrow strip on both sides of the Harts River, extending NE from its confluence with the Vaal River near Delportshoop to a point near Taung.

  • L. lesliei v. hornii: Cole number(s):C015, C364. Light ochre to rusty brown coloured body with greyish brown branching patterning. Yellow flowers. Endemic to a small area SW and S of Modderrivier

  • L. lesliei v. minor: Cole number(s): C006. Yellow-brown to rusty brown, very similar to the typical form of var. lesliei, but consistently smaller and with slightly different markings. Yellow flowers. Distribution: RSA: Tvl, in a very small area to the SW of Swartruggens, thus within the range of var. lesliei.

  • L. lesliei v. rubrobrumnea: Cole number(s):C107, C204. Differs from the type variety mainly for the red brow colour. Distribution: RSA: Tvl, within the range of var. lesliei, in a very small area W of Randfontein and Krugersdorp.

  • L. lesliei subsp. burchellii:  Cole number(s):C302, C308. Distinguished from subsp. lesliei by colour and markings, and from var. venteri by the much finer meshlike markings and clavate marginal lines. Origin: RSA: CP, in small area NE of Douglas. It is probable that this subspecies occurs also in the military zone further to the NE, along the Vaal River.

Cultivars:

  • L. lesliei "Albiflora" :  Cole number(s): C005A. Extremely rare white flowering form, occasionally found  in any one colony, , but in all other respects the plants are indistinguishable from others in the same colony. They can therefore be identified only when in flower.

  • L. lesliei "albinica":  Cole number(s):C036A. Distinctly translucent, grass green to yellowish sheen with yellow lines and patches. White flowers. Known only from one locality, CP.

  • L. lesliei cv.  Storm's albinigold: Cole number(s):C036B. Distinctly translucent, grass green to yellowish sheen with yellow lines and patches with rich yellow flowers. It is indistinguishable from acf 'Albinica'. It can therefore be identified only when in flower.

  • L. lesliei v. minor cv. Witblom: Cole number(s):C006A. White flowering form.  It is indistinguishable from the standar v. minor. It can therefore be identified only when in flower.  

Bibliography:

  • COLE, DESMOND T. and NAUREEN A., (2005) Lithops Flowering Stones, Cactus&Co. Libri.

 

Notes: In time of drought the plants shrivel and are almost invisible as they get covered with fine wind-blown sand. After rain, however, they absorb water and become fat and turgid. There is a considerable correlation between the colour of different populations and the nature of their habitats. The more widespread a taxa is the more variation within that taxa.

 

 

Photo gallery: Alphabetical listing of Cactus and Succulent pictures published in this site.

Photo gallery LITHOPS

Family: Mesebrianthemaceae (Aizoaceae)

Scientific name: Lithops lesliei (N.E. Br.) N.E. Br. (1912)  Field number C36A - Locality (TL) near Warrenton Northern Cape SA cv. Albinica   (Yellow flowering + green bodied form)  

Origin: (TL) near Warrenton Northern Cape SA


 

 

 


 

Above: A green C36B "Storms albinigold" and a plant from the same batch of seeds reverted to the original rusty type C36 
Below: Rust and green seedling around a rusty mother plant.

Photo of conspecific taxa, varieties, forms and cultivars of Lithops lesliei

 



 

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This old page has been moved! Click the link next on the right to enter the new Enciclopedia of Succulents. We hope you find this new site informative and useful.

Encyclopedia of Succulents