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Lithops olivacea C109
10 km N of Pofadder, South Africa

 
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 This Lithops has green bodies with large open pinkish windows

 

 

 

 

Photo of conspecific taxa, varieties, forms and cultivars of Lithops olivacea

 

 

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Family: Mesebrianthemaceae (Aizoaceae)

Scientific name: Lithops olivacea L. Bol. 1929 var. olivacea

Common English Names include: Stone plant, Green stone plant, Living stone.

Origin: The two varieties of L. olivacea (var. olivacea and var. nebrownii) are restricted and occur sporadically in Bushmanland, and are found most abundantly however in the region of Aggeneys, Pofadder and Namies, although there are earlier collections far to the east from the Kakamas area, where it has not been seen in recent times.

Habitat:  L. olivacea is a quartz lover and will always be found growing either on big outcrops of quartz or more commonly on quartz plains where the quartz pebbles protect the plants from the blazing summer sun by reflecting a lot of the light and heat.

Ecology:Its hard translucent gloss closely resembles the white quartz crystalline rubble of its habitat.  Another succulent plant that is almost always found growing with L. olivacea is Avonia papyracea, which loves quartz too. In times of drought the plants shrivel and are almost invisible, as they get covered with fine wind-blown sand.  After rain, however, they absorb water and become fat and turgid. There is a considerable correlation between the colour of different populations and the nature of their habitats. For example L. olivacea, which is more red-brown, green-brown in appearance in its westerly locations, becomes yellower in the dry season and more purplish-red-grey further north. The more widespread a taxa,  the more there is  variation within that taxa.

 

 



 

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This old page has been moved! Click the link next on the right to enter the new Enciclopedia of Succulents. We hope you find this new site informative and useful.

Encyclopedia of Succulents