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Mammillaria tlalocii
(Syn: Mammillaria crucigera subsp. tlalocii)

CACTUSPEDIA       

 


Mammillaria tlalocii is an attractive and rewarding cactus with dense white spines
The slow growth rate  make it one of the most sought-after species.
 

Description: Globular cactus, solitary or clumping dichotomously; usually this species don't produces lateral shoots. But in cultivation are frequently seen plant that branch profusely from the base.
Stem: Globose, later columnar, curving pipe-shaped, to 20 cm long, 5 to 7 cm wide.  The axil is white-wooled.
Radial spines: 16 to 22, glassy white, 1 to 2 mm long, the longer sideways pointing.
Central spines: On the areoles at the apex of the plant, with age, may appear a single longer brown-black central spine 6-10 mm long.
Flowers: Carmine-pink, 12 to 14 mm long, 8 to 10 mm wide.
Flowering time: Blooms in late winter, early spring.
Fruits: Carmine-pink small.
Seeds: Small, brown.


A very showy species with minute
white spines and purple flowers.
 

Forms rings of small carmine-pink flowers in spring.

Cultivation: It is a  slow growing  species .  Use pot with good drainage and a very porous mineral-based potting mix,  keep dry in winter. Pot plants are quite wet-sensitively. Care must be taken with watering (Rot prone) and needs good drainage. Water sparingly during the growing season, keep very dry in winter.  Feed with a high potassium fertilizer  in summer.
Usually it is recommended to overwinter this plant in a bright and warm greenhouse with at least 8-10° C , but it proved to be quite frost resistant
(if kept dry it hardy as low as -5° C)Outside full sun or afternoon shade, inside needs bright light, and some direct sun.
Some plants will offset readily, and clumps can be produced in a very few years.

Propagation: Direct  sow after last frost, cuttings or grafting.
 


An old specimen
 

Comment: This is one of the Mammillaria commonly called "Owl Eye Cactus", known for dichotomous branching (forking or dividing into two parts). Although dichotomous branching is not a common occurrence in cacti in general, it happens for some reason in this particular subspecies.  What is interesting about this cactus is that it began as a single head, and it has now divided twice, forming what will be four separate branches. When the division process started, it was obvious that four heads would appear, but I don’t think the one head divided quadruply. Most probably, one head became two, and then those two immediately divided.
Other Owl Eye Cactus among others comprise: M. karwnskiana, M. formosa,  M. microthele and M. perbella.

 

 

Photo gallery: Alphabetical listing of Cactus and Succulent pictures published in this site.

Photo gallery MAMMILLARIA

Family: Cactaceae (Cactus Family)

Scientific name:  Mammillaria tlalocii Reppenhagen 1989
Published in: Gattung Mammillaria 1988: 120 (1989)
First description: by Reppenhagen, Gatt. Mamm. 120 (1987)

Origin:  Mexico, (at the border of the states of Puebla and Oaxaca).

Habitat:  Altitude 800 to 1.000 m.

Conservation status: Listed in CITES appendix 2.

Synonyms:

  • Mammillaria crucigera subsp. tlalocii (Reppenhagen) D. R. Hunt 1997
  • Mammillaria buchenaui Backeberg 1963
  • Mammillaria crucigera var. tlalocii (Reppenhagen) Linzen et al. 1998
  • Mammillaria crucigera var. grandinosa Linzen et al. 1998
  • Mammillaria crucigera Martius 1832


 

 



Thin brownish-black centrals
 will eventually form with age

Photo of conspecific taxa, varieties, forms and cultivars of Mammillaria crucigera complex (This Taxon has lots of synonyms whit several controversial varieties and subspecies):



 

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This old page has been moved! Click the link next on the right to enter the new Enciclopedia of Cacti. We hope you find this new site informative and useful.

The Encyclopedia of Cacti